Leave Spooky to Ghosts, Not Your Favorite Halloween Candy

For many of us, “Spooky Season” is one of the most anticipated times of the year. We live for the classic signs of Autumn that lead up to October 31st, like the cool, crisp weather and Friday nights devoted to horror movie marathons (or Hocus Pocus if that’s your thing, we won’t judge). But for some, this time of year poses a scary dilemma, worse than having to decide on a costume for your office’s annual Halloween party. For the roughly 32 million Americans who suffer from common food allergies, the unofficial Day-of-Collecting-Candy-From-Strangers can cause anything (and everything) from stress and anxiety to life-threatening medical emergencies. 

And while we here at Voyage Foods eagerly await (and are working to create) a world in which everyone can trick-or-treat safely and enjoyably — cue our soon-to-be-released cacao-free chocolate and nut-free peanut butter — we know there are necessary precautions allergy-sufferers can (and should) take to make the best of Halloween this year. Because let’s face it: it’s 2021 and there should be fun and safe alternatives for kids who need them. And no, a pack of floss from the neighborhood dentist doesn’t count.

So in an effort to lend a helping hand to those parents who are a bit apprehensive to take their miniature witches and cowboys out for some good old-fashioned trick-or-treating this Sunday, we’ve compiled a list of resources that ought to help.

Halloween Tips, Tricks, and Treats for the Allergen-Free Crowd

The Teal Pumpkin Project 🎃

A campaign straight from Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE), and adopted by allergy allies across the country, the Teal Pumpkin Project allows kids with food allergies to trick-or-treat alongside their friends — and still enjoy some Halloween fun. Participating houses will have an identifiable teal-colored pumpkin (or sign on the door) with non-food items, like toys, for kids to take. Handing out candy this year? Keep an eye out for trick-or-treaters with their own teal pumpkins — signaling those with food allergies. 

Get Creative With Non-Candy Offerings ✏️

Just because allergen-free kids can’t enjoy many of the readily available candy offerings on the market doesn’t mean there’s a shortage of ways to entertain them nonetheless. Besides, we’ve all been to that one house that thinks it’s a fun idea to hand out apples or raisins and as well-intentioned as that may be, it isn’t fooling anyone. From coloring supplies to glow sticks, this list from Children’s Health has you covered. 

Dip Into the World of Allergen-Friendly Candy 🍭

If you’re feeling a bit more adventurous than pencils and stickers, there are enough allergen-friendly — often by coincidence — goodies to satisfy a trick-or-treater’s sweet tooth. Whether it’s for kids with nut or egg allergies, check out this list of some of the top allergen-friendly candy picks (which will surely include Voyage’s cacao-free chocolate and nut-free peanut butter in due time 😉 ). 

Hold Out for Voyage’s Delectable (and Allergen-Friendly) Offerings 🚀

Of course, those looking to get their hands on safe-to-eat peanut butter and chocolate that rival their traditional counterparts will need to wait just a little longer. And while that may not be helpful this “Spooky Season,” prepare yourselves for our scary good cacao-free chocolate and nut-free peanut butter for Halloween 2022. 

 

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